Pot Bound

Pot Bound?

No, I’m not asking whether you are heading to the closest pot dispensary.  Nor am I referring the condition of a plant that has cemented itself into a pot with excessive root growth.  I am asking if you are bound to your garden because you have so many potted plants that you can’t go anywhere because they have to be watered so often. 

 I suspected we had pot bound disease, but it really came to light as we left the last SPPC meeting.  I was trying to get rid of some pots left over from the tools and treasures table, and I asked Pat McKnight if she wanted a pot.  She exclaimed that the only plants she had were in the ground.  What a smart lady!  On the other hand we have pots . . lots of pots.  I decided to count them and I came up with over 200.  So if anyone is pot bound, it is we.  This year we scheduled no trips between March and August.  In August we have a gardening friend who will come over a couple times to keep all the potted plants alive.  My goal for the future is to reduce the number of potted plants so that we will be vacation bound when the weather heats up.  What’s your situation?  Do you likewise feel the urge to be pot free?

Stan

Clay Pots

If you want to seal a clay pot so you can apply mosaic materials, or if you simply want to cut down on the water loss through the pot wall, there are many products designed for this purpose.  For instance, if you Google “How to seal flower pots,” you will see a product called “Clay Pot Sealer” that is available at Walmart.  The site also explains how to apply it.  If you have left over granite or grout sealer around, that will also work.  

Bananas and Mallets

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If you have a twist tiller and no longer are using it, I will buy it from you.  A member of the Iris Club wants one.  She also wants 2 round nose and one flat end shovels, a pick axe, hula hoe, rake, and wheel barrow.

If you have harvested too many bananas at one time, (You do have a banana tree in your garden, don’t you?) as soon as a banana starts to get those brown spots, put them in the frig.  They may turn really ugly, but the fruit will stay palatable for days.

A tool you may wish to consider is a rubber mallet.  Removing a plant from a pot is generally easy with plastic pots.  You are able to squeeze the sides to loosen the soil.  But with a clay or ceramic pot removal can be a chore.  This is a two man job, but if one person supports the plant and soil on its side or up-side down, the other person can rap on the top of the lip of the pot to knock it loose.  Using a block of wood with a regular hammer will also work and keep you from breaking the pot.

Stan, The Blog Man